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Do contact lenses bother your eyes?
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It’s not uncommon for people to complain that their contact lenses are uncomfortable. But whether you wear them every day or just occasionally, you shouldn’t feel discomfort or irritation when you wear your contact lenses. Let’s review some things you can do to ensure a great experience with your contact lenses every time you wear them.
Replace your lenses on schedule.
You should replace your lenses as often as suggested, even if you don’t wear them every day. Wearing lenses beyond their recommended use is a common reason for eye irritation, and it also increases your risk of developing serious eye infections.
Clean your lenses well.
There are several different systems for keeping your lenses clean. Many people use a multipurpose solution for cleaning, rinsing, disinfecting, and storing their contact lenses each day. While some solutions are marketed as “no-rub” solutions, we still find that rubbing your contacts thoroughly during the cleaning process increases comfort and better removes any film or debris. Always wash your hands before removing or inserting your contacts. If you use a lotion or moisturizer, wait until after you’re done handling your contacts, as residue from the lotion can stick to the contacts.
Don’t use water.
If you run out of contact lens solution, it’s tempting to use water as a backup for cleaning and storage. Don’t do it! Not only will it increase your discomfort, water often has microbes that can introduce infections and further irritate your eyes.
No saliva, either!
Like water, it’s tempting to use your own saliva when you don’t have solution with you to rinse and clean your contacts. But using saliva will also increase your risk of irritation and infection.
When they are really uncomfortable…
If your contact lenses are really uncomfortable, there may be some dust or other debris  clinging to your contacts and irritating your eyes. Remove your contacts and clean them thoroughly, letting your eyes rest before placing the lenses back in your eyes. Always be sure your contacts aren’t “inside out,” as they won’t feel good if they’re not inserted the right way. If they still don’t feel good, try giving your eyes more of a break by wearing glasses instead of contacts for a while. Allow your contacts to soak, or throw them out and start with a fresh pair.

Never let your eyes bother you for very long before seeing your eye doctor. You might have an allergy or eye infection that should be treated. We might be able to recommend another type of contact lens or cleaning and storage solution. Regardless, we’ll help identify the underlying reason for discomfort so that you can get back to enjoying clear and comfortable vision every day!

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