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Not All Sunglasses Are The Same
Who doesn’t love the outdoors on a gorgeous sun-filled day? If you spend a great deal of time outside, you’re likely at a higher risk for eye damage caused by UV rays. The good news is with the right eye protection, you can reduce your exposure to solar radiation so that it’s not an issue. 

Most people are aware that getting too much sun is bad for your skin, but what they usually don’t know the same principle applies to their eyes. If your eyes are exposed to excessive amounts of UV radiation over a short period of time, you’re likely to experience a condition called photokeratitis, which in essence is an eye sunburn. Symptoms can include redness, a gritty sensation, extreme sensitivity to light, and excessive tearing. Photokeratitis is usually temporary and rarely causes permanent damage. 

Serious conditions, such as cataracts or retina damage, are often caused by long-term exposure to UV radiation.

To protect your eyes, you need sunglasses, and not just …
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When Does Your Baby Need a Vision Appointment? If you’ve welcomed a little one into your life, one of the greatest moments you’ll cherish is looking into their eyes for the first time. Not every baby makes eye contact, but there’s good reason for that. Much like walking or talking, the visual system of an infant takes some time to develop—in fact, in the first weeks after birth they don’t see much detail and only see in black and white plus shades of gray. While it takes several months for your child’s vision to develop, there are some steps you can take to ensure they have proper vision. 

Once your baby is born, your doctor will quickly examine her eyes to rule out any serious problems. While such problems are rare, it’s vital to detect any issues right away in order to treat and minimize their impact on your child’s visual development. 

During your child’s first few months, she will start to focus on objects that are 8 to 10 inches away from her face, which is generally the distance at…
Eat Your Way to Healthier Vision It’s true that “you are what you eat,” even when it comes to your vision. By choosing foods that are full of powerful nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids, lutein, zinc as well as vitamin C and E, you can nourish your eyes with what they need to help prevent age-related eye problems. 

Macular degeneration affects more than 13 million Americans, and approximately half of Americans over the age of 80 have cataracts. Simply by changing your diet, you can protect your eyes from these conditions. So, the next time you’re at the grocery store, try shopping around the perimeter of the store. This is where you’ll find produce and protein to not only properly fuel your body, but also your eyes. 

Super Foods That Do Your Eyes Good
Carrots, Bell peppers, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Garlic, Turkey, Sweet potatoes, Spinach, Wild salmon, Sardines, Kale, Oranges, Eggs, Nuts and seeds

If you really want to pack a healthy punch, try some eye-healthy recipes. For instance,…
Tips for Those Who Wear Contact Lenses It doesn’t matter if you’ve worn contact lenses for years or you’re about to wear your first pair—there are some basic tips you should know to avoid problems with your lenses. Read on to learn how you can properly take care of your alternative to glasses. Inspect the lens. Before you place a lens in your eye, you need to check to see if it’s inverted or not. First, make sure you wash and dry your hands before you handle your lens. This will prevent any bacteria from being introduced. Next, put the lens on your finger so that it forms a cup. Bring your finger up to your eye level and look at the side of the lens. If it forms a “U” shape with its top edges flared out, your contact lens is inside out. If it forms a “U” without a flare, you’re good to go. Make a routine. Your lenses are different, meaning the left and right lenses are meant to be put in your left and right eyes, respectively. (It’s really no different than your shoes. Think about it: Yo…
The Correct Way to Use Eye Drops When you’re trying to combat dry eye, eye allergies, or eye infections, it’s likely you’ll use some sort of over-the-counter or prescribed eye drop solution to treat your ailment. To properly use the drops, you should follow the steps below. Wash your hands—this will prevent new bacteria from getting into your eye. Tilt your head back and look at the ceiling. Gently pull your lower eyelid down so that it forms a small pocket. Turn your eye drop solution bottle upside-down and squeeze its bottom to release a single drop into your eye. If you missed your eye on the first try, go ahead and squeeze a second drop. (It’s important that you don’t touch your eye or eyelid with the nozzle of the bottle.) Release your lower eyelid and gently close your eye for 30 seconds. Dab any excess medication with a tissue. If you need to apply another type of eye drop medication, make sure you wait 3 to 5 minutes before doing so. This lets you get the maximum effect from each med…
How You Can Beat Digital Screen Fatigue When was the last time you looked at a device screen? Chances are you’re doing it right now. In today’s world, people spend hours in front of their computers and mobile devices. While being a part of a connected world has its benefits, it also has one sneaky drawback. You might not even realize it, but all of that time spent looking at a screen may be causing you eyestrain. 

Eyestrain can happen when your eyes become tired from overuse. 
So while it’s easy to blame electronic devices for this annoying condition, it’s not the only contributing factor. Some people experience eyestrain after driving for extended periods of time, reading non-digital books for long hours, being exposed to bright light or glare, or straining to see in dimly-lit areas. 

At the top of the list, though, is computer eyestrain. Because it’s the most common cause of eyestrain, it actually has its own diagnosis: computer vision syndrome. Underlying conditions such as an eye musc…
What to do When Something Gets in Your Eye Everyone’s been through this situation: One minute you’re going about life as happy as a clam, but then suddenly you feel something in your eye. It’s an unpleasant feeling, and your first instinct is to rub your eye to try to remedy the situation—we’re here to tell you, do not rub your eye!

You can harm yourself by rubbing your eye. Rubbing only irritates your eye more and increases the risk of dragging the object across your eye and scratching its surface. This is a painful injury because the cornea of your eye (the clear front portion of your eye) contains a lot of nerve endings and is very sensitive. What’s more, you can also embed objects into your eye when you rub it. 

In lieu of rubbing out the offending object, here’s what you should do when you get something in your eye:

Try blinking your eye quickly. This can easily dislodge and dirt or debris that may have entered it. 

Have someone else look at your eye to determine the location of the f…