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Theatrical Contacts: Safe or Not? If you’re looking to add an extra touch of flair to your Halloween costume, you may be considering special-effects contact lenses. There are all kinds of fun options these days, from red and black lenses (to get the “undead” look) to black slit pupil lenses (for that extra feline touch).

But the question is, are theatrical contacts safe? Alarmingly, larger (supposedly) reputable companies are now selling special-effects contacts. Some online companies even claim their theatrical contacts are FDA-approved. However, this is NOT the case.

Theatrical contacts can be perfectly safe, but purchasing them online without a prescription is an invitation for eye problems. They may be expired or unsterile. Whether you have perfect vision or not, you need to get a prescription from your friendly neighborhood eye doctor to ensure you’re getting your contacts legally and safely. Any online retailer that does not require a prescription is not being held to the same safe…
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What Causes “Double Vision”? One eye health symptom we encounter is what we call “double vision,” or diplopia. While some causes of double vision are relatively insignificant, others are serious and should receive immediate medical attention. Here are some of the common causes of double vision: Lens Problems. The most common lens problem that causes double vision is known Cataracts. Cataracts can affect and distort vision in one or both eyes, and are treatable with minor surgery. Corneal Problems. It’s common for double vision caused by an issue with the cornea to affect just one of your eyes. Corneal problems include corneal scars, dry corneas, and corneal infections. Muscle Problems.A weak eye muscles can distort vision, as the week eye can no longer move smoothly with the healthy eye. Week eye muscles are seen in people with certain autoimmune illnesses and thyroid conditions. Nerve Problems. Conditions such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes can damage to the nerves that control the eye…
Is Eye Twitching Serious? If you’ve ever been short on sleep or greatly-stressed, you might have also experienced repetitive, uncontrollable eye spasms known as blepharospasm, or eye twitching. While it can be annoying, eye twitching is usually fairly painless and harmless, indicating nothing more than increased fatigue, stress, or caffeine intake. Once these issues are resolved, the eye twitching usually disappears. In rarer cases, eye twitching will become chronic, affecting the individual’s quality of life or progressing to the point of severe vision impairment.
If an eye twitch doesn’t resolve itself within a few days, or your eye twitch is strong enough to close the entire eye or affect other areas of your face, you should make an appointment to be seen at our office to determine the underlying cause and begin any possible treatments.
Do contact lenses bother your eyes? It’s not uncommon for people to complain that their contact lenses are uncomfortable. But whether you wear them every day or just occasionally, you shouldn’t feel discomfort or irritation when you wear your contact lenses. Let’s review some things you can do to ensure a great experience with your contact lenses every time you wear them. Replace your lenses on schedule.
You should replace your lenses as often as suggested, even if you don’t wear them every day. Wearing lenses beyond their recommended use is a common reason for eye irritation, and it also increases your risk of developing serious eye infections. Clean your lenses well.
There are several different systems for keeping your lenses clean. Many people use a multipurpose solution for cleaning, rinsing, disinfecting, and storing their contact lenses each day. While some solutions are marketed as “no-rub” solutions, we still find that rubbing your contacts thoroughly during the cleaning process in…
Antioxidants and your eyes
Antioxidants are nutrients that defend cells from damage caused by molecules known as free radicals. Too many free radicals can cause eye health issues, including advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Antioxidants help reduce the formation of free radicals and help protect and repair cells damaged by them.
We recommend a diet high in antioxidants, plus vitamin and mineral supplements, for all people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Some common antioxidants include vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, and selenium. You’ll usually find them in colorful fruits and vegetables, especially those with purple, blue, red, orange, and yellow hues.
Work-Related Eye Trauma: Know Your Risks You may know that there are many things that can hurt your vision—smoking, poor nutrition, computer eye strain…but did you know that your day job could create an even bigger risk to your overall eye health than you realize? Over 300,000 Americans suffer eye injuries on the job every day without realizing the damage that occurred could be long-term. While many companies do a huge part by training their employees on eye safety if they are in high-risk positions, it’s also important to take personal responsibility for your eye safety. Here are some common ways workers injure their eyes: Burns from flying sparks Chemical burns Welding fumes Flying particles Flying objects like metal or glass Tools Machine operator error Even if you don’t work in a labor-intensive environment, you still may be exposed to a combination of these dangers. Be smart about your situation and protect your eyes with OSHA-compliant eye safety wear whenever possible. While it may not p…
Prepping for Your Next Eye Appointment Whether you’re visiting our office for the first time or you’ve been a patient for years, you can do a little homework to be better prepared for your next appointment. To identify some items you should discuss during your next visit, consider the following:

What daily activities impact your eyes? For instance, do you spend lots of time in front of a computer screen or do you find yourself mostly outdoors? Those who frequently use digital devices might experience eye strain while those who work outside are more susceptible to eye sunburns or cancer caused by UV light. If you tell us about the conditions that impact your vision, such as the examples listed here, we can better address your personal eye health.

Have you noticed a change in your eye sight? Even if you answered “no,” your vision can gradually decline without your knowledge. As you age, the sharpness of your visual acuity declines. By the time you reach 40 years old, it’s common to experie…