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The Skinny on Eye Color Genes You may have learned in biology class that your eye color is determined by the genes you inherited. (Genes are essentially “sets of recipes” that are provided in our DNA.) Along with that, you were probably taught about dominant and recessive genes. For eyes, the dominant gene for the color brown always won over the recessive gene for blue eyes. Unfortunately, that information isn’t right. In the past decade, scientists have discovered the influence of genes on eye color is a little more complicated.

A number of different factors define a person’s eye color, the most important of which is eight different color-related genes. The genes control how much melanin, or color pigment, exists in the iris of your eyes. For instance, a gene called OCA2 controls almost 75 percent of the blue-brown color spectrum. Other genes can overrule OCA2, but that rarely happens. This can explain why green eyes are a rarity throughout the world.
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Presbyopia is a Part of Getting Older As we age, our bodies change due to natural wear and tear. Our skin starts to wrinkle and sag, muscles begin to shrink and lose mass, and hair becomes grayer. Your visual acuity also begins to decline, and this typically happens after you reach the age of 40. This common condition is called presbyopia, which means “old eyes” in Latin.   

Because it’s an age-related change and not a disease, presbyopia can’t be prevented. However, living a healthy lifestyle that includes exercise and a well-balanced diet can help slow the process. 

What causes presbyopia? The lenses of our eyes lose their flexibility, causing them to become weaker over time. This makes it difficult to focus on close objects. While the condition may seem to occur suddenly, it actually takes a few years for your lenses to become weak.  

Common symptoms. If you hold reading materials at arm’s length, you might have presbyopia. Additional signs include blurred vision when you’re reading at…
Are You Playing it Safe? Spring is finally here, and more people are getting outdoors to participate in sports and recreation.  

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, tens of thousands of sports and recreation-related eye injuries occur every year. This ranges from scratches on the surface of the eye to blinding injuries. Because your regular eyewear doesn’t offer protection from such incidents, you need protective eyewear that’s appropriate for your level of activity. By doing this, you can prevent up to 90 percent of serious eye injuries.

According to www.geteyesmart.org, the following will help protect your and your family’s vision during sports and outdoor recreation activities. 
Youth that play sports should wear eye protection such as polycarbonate lenses or masks that meet the requirements of the American Society of Testing Materials, even if the league doesn’t require it. People who wear contacts or glasses should also wear protective eyewear because contacts offer no…
Not All Sunglasses Are The Same
Who doesn’t love the outdoors on a gorgeous sun-filled day? If you spend a great deal of time outside, you’re likely at a higher risk for eye damage caused by UV rays. The good news is with the right eye protection, you can reduce your exposure to solar radiation so that it’s not an issue. 

Most people are aware that getting too much sun is bad for your skin, but what they usually don’t know the same principle applies to their eyes. If your eyes are exposed to excessive amounts of UV radiation over a short period of time, you’re likely to experience a condition called photokeratitis, which in essence is an eye sunburn. Symptoms can include redness, a gritty sensation, extreme sensitivity to light, and excessive tearing. Photokeratitis is usually temporary and rarely causes permanent damage. 

Serious conditions, such as cataracts or retina damage, are often caused by long-term exposure to UV radiation.

To protect your eyes, you need sunglasses, and not just …
When Does Your Baby Need a Vision Appointment? If you’ve welcomed a little one into your life, one of the greatest moments you’ll cherish is looking into their eyes for the first time. Not every baby makes eye contact, but there’s good reason for that. Much like walking or talking, the visual system of an infant takes some time to develop—in fact, in the first weeks after birth they don’t see much detail and only see in black and white plus shades of gray. While it takes several months for your child’s vision to develop, there are some steps you can take to ensure they have proper vision. 

Once your baby is born, your doctor will quickly examine her eyes to rule out any serious problems. While such problems are rare, it’s vital to detect any issues right away in order to treat and minimize their impact on your child’s visual development. 

During your child’s first few months, she will start to focus on objects that are 8 to 10 inches away from her face, which is generally the distance at…
Eat Your Way to Healthier Vision It’s true that “you are what you eat,” even when it comes to your vision. By choosing foods that are full of powerful nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids, lutein, zinc as well as vitamin C and E, you can nourish your eyes with what they need to help prevent age-related eye problems. 

Macular degeneration affects more than 13 million Americans, and approximately half of Americans over the age of 80 have cataracts. Simply by changing your diet, you can protect your eyes from these conditions. So, the next time you’re at the grocery store, try shopping around the perimeter of the store. This is where you’ll find produce and protein to not only properly fuel your body, but also your eyes. 

Super Foods That Do Your Eyes Good
Carrots, Bell peppers, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Garlic, Turkey, Sweet potatoes, Spinach, Wild salmon, Sardines, Kale, Oranges, Eggs, Nuts and seeds

If you really want to pack a healthy punch, try some eye-healthy recipes. For instance,…
Tips for Those Who Wear Contact Lenses It doesn’t matter if you’ve worn contact lenses for years or you’re about to wear your first pair—there are some basic tips you should know to avoid problems with your lenses. Read on to learn how you can properly take care of your alternative to glasses. Inspect the lens. Before you place a lens in your eye, you need to check to see if it’s inverted or not. First, make sure you wash and dry your hands before you handle your lens. This will prevent any bacteria from being introduced. Next, put the lens on your finger so that it forms a cup. Bring your finger up to your eye level and look at the side of the lens. If it forms a “U” shape with its top edges flared out, your contact lens is inside out. If it forms a “U” without a flare, you’re good to go. Make a routine. Your lenses are different, meaning the left and right lenses are meant to be put in your left and right eyes, respectively. (It’s really no different than your shoes. Think about it: Yo…