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Antioxidants and your eyes
Antioxidants are nutrients that defend cells from damage caused by molecules known as free radicals. Too many free radicals can cause eye health issues, including advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Antioxidants help reduce the formation of free radicals and help protect and repair cells damaged by them.
We recommend a diet high in antioxidants, plus vitamin and mineral supplements, for all people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Some common antioxidants include vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, and selenium. You’ll usually find them in colorful fruits and vegetables, especially those with purple, blue, red, orange, and yellow hues.
Recent posts
Work-Related Eye Trauma: Know Your Risks You may know that there are many things that can hurt your vision—smoking, poor nutrition, computer eye strain…but did you know that your day job could create an even bigger risk to your overall eye health than you realize? Over 300,000 Americans suffer eye injuries on the job every day without realizing the damage that occurred could be long-term. While many companies do a huge part by training their employees on eye safety if they are in high-risk positions, it’s also important to take personal responsibility for your eye safety. Here are some common ways workers injure their eyes: Burns from flying sparks Chemical burns Welding fumes Flying particles Flying objects like metal or glass Tools Machine operator error Even if you don’t work in a labor-intensive environment, you still may be exposed to a combination of these dangers. Be smart about your situation and protect your eyes with OSHA-compliant eye safety wear whenever possible. While it may not p…
Prepping for Your Next Eye Appointment Whether you’re visiting our office for the first time or you’ve been a patient for years, you can do a little homework to be better prepared for your next appointment. To identify some items you should discuss during your next visit, consider the following:

What daily activities impact your eyes? For instance, do you spend lots of time in front of a computer screen or do you find yourself mostly outdoors? Those who frequently use digital devices might experience eye strain while those who work outside are more susceptible to eye sunburns or cancer caused by UV light. If you tell us about the conditions that impact your vision, such as the examples listed here, we can better address your personal eye health.

Have you noticed a change in your eye sight? Even if you answered “no,” your vision can gradually decline without your knowledge. As you age, the sharpness of your visual acuity declines. By the time you reach 40 years old, it’s common to experie…
Traumatic Brain Injuries & Vision It’s not uncommon for someone who experiences a traumatic brain injury (TBI) to develop visual problems. A TBI can be caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. TBIs can range in severity from mild to severe—in fact, the CDC says that most TBIs that occur in the United States are mild and more commonly known as concussions.  Each year, TBIs contribute to a substantial number of disability cases. A short- or long-term loss in vision quality is just one of the many symptoms an individual may experience. A TBI can also impact attention and memory, coordination and balance, hearing, perception, and touch. Personality changes, aggressive behavior, poor impulse control, and mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety, can also appear after a TBI.    In addition to cognitive, physical, or other sensory impairments, here are some common visual problems that can result from a bra…
The Skinny on Eye Color Genes You may have learned in biology class that your eye color is determined by the genes you inherited. (Genes are essentially “sets of recipes” that are provided in our DNA.) Along with that, you were probably taught about dominant and recessive genes. For eyes, the dominant gene for the color brown always won over the recessive gene for blue eyes. Unfortunately, that information isn’t right. In the past decade, scientists have discovered the influence of genes on eye color is a little more complicated.

A number of different factors define a person’s eye color, the most important of which is eight different color-related genes. The genes control how much melanin, or color pigment, exists in the iris of your eyes. For instance, a gene called OCA2 controls almost 75 percent of the blue-brown color spectrum. Other genes can overrule OCA2, but that rarely happens. This can explain why green eyes are a rarity throughout the world.
Presbyopia is a Part of Getting Older As we age, our bodies change due to natural wear and tear. Our skin starts to wrinkle and sag, muscles begin to shrink and lose mass, and hair becomes grayer. Your visual acuity also begins to decline, and this typically happens after you reach the age of 40. This common condition is called presbyopia, which means “old eyes” in Latin.   

Because it’s an age-related change and not a disease, presbyopia can’t be prevented. However, living a healthy lifestyle that includes exercise and a well-balanced diet can help slow the process. 

What causes presbyopia? The lenses of our eyes lose their flexibility, causing them to become weaker over time. This makes it difficult to focus on close objects. While the condition may seem to occur suddenly, it actually takes a few years for your lenses to become weak.  

Common symptoms. If you hold reading materials at arm’s length, you might have presbyopia. Additional signs include blurred vision when you’re reading at…
Are You Playing it Safe? Spring is finally here, and more people are getting outdoors to participate in sports and recreation.  

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, tens of thousands of sports and recreation-related eye injuries occur every year. This ranges from scratches on the surface of the eye to blinding injuries. Because your regular eyewear doesn’t offer protection from such incidents, you need protective eyewear that’s appropriate for your level of activity. By doing this, you can prevent up to 90 percent of serious eye injuries.

According to www.geteyesmart.org, the following will help protect your and your family’s vision during sports and outdoor recreation activities. 
Youth that play sports should wear eye protection such as polycarbonate lenses or masks that meet the requirements of the American Society of Testing Materials, even if the league doesn’t require it. People who wear contacts or glasses should also wear protective eyewear because contacts offer no…