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If you find yourself squinting to see street signs, the computer screen at work or a picture hanging across the room, it’s likely you are nearsighted. Maybe you have to hold a book far away to read it, have trouble reading the fine print on medicine labels or reading a map. If that’s the case, it’s likely you are farsighted. 

To put it simply, nearsightedness is when a person can see better close up than far away and farsightedness is when a person can see better far away than close up. 

In normal vision, light enters the eye and is perfectly focused onto the retina, providing a clear view, no matter how near or far the object in view is located. Nearsighted vision focuses on an image before it reaches the retina, often caused when the curve of the cornea is too steep. Just the opposite, farsighted vision focuses on an image behind the retina, occurring when the cornea is too flat or the eye is too short. 

Both nearsightedness and farsightedness are frustrating, interfere with daily activities and quality of life, but there is good news. Both conditions can be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. The best approach can be determined by your optometrist.

Want to see clearly at any distance? Call our office today at 814-234-6060 and we’ll get you setup with the appropriate corrective action before your vision continues to deteriorate. 

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