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It’s not uncommon for someone who experiences a traumatic brain injury (TBI) to develop visual problems. A TBI can be caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. TBIs can range in severity from mild to severe—in fact, the CDC says that most TBIs that occur in the United States are mild and more commonly known as concussions. 
Each year, TBIs contribute to a substantial number of disability cases. A short- or long-term loss in vision quality is just one of the many symptoms an individual may experience. A TBI can also impact attention and memory, coordination and balance, hearing, perception, and touch. Personality changes, aggressive behavior, poor impulse control, and mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety, can also appear after a TBI.   
In addition to cognitive, physical, or other sensory impairments, here are some common visual problems that can result from a brain injury:
  • Blurred vision
  • Sensitivity to light and glare
  • Reading difficulties
  • Headaches associated with visual tasks
  • Frequent bumping into objects, especially with one side of your body
  • Double vision
  • Aching eyes
  • Reduction or loss of visual field
  • Difficulty with eye movements
  • Unable to maintain eye contact
  • Dizziness/vertigo
  • Dry eyes
  • Visual hallucinations

Treatments such as vision rehabilitation, corrective lenses, or light therapy can be used to successfully reduce or eliminate vision impairments caused by TBIs. Brain injury or not, if you experience any of the symptoms listed above, give us a call. We can quickly pinpoint any issues with a comprehensive eye exam.  

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