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As we age, our bodies change due to natural wear and tear. Our skin starts to wrinkle and sag, muscles begin to shrink and lose mass, and hair becomes grayer. Your visual acuity also begins to decline, and this typically happens after you reach the age of 40. This common condition is called presbyopia, which means “old eyes” in Latin.   

Because it’s an age-related change and not a disease, presbyopia can’t be prevented. However, living a healthy lifestyle that includes exercise and a well-balanced diet can help slow the process. 

What causes presbyopia? The lenses of our eyes lose their flexibility, causing them to become weaker over time. This makes it difficult to focus on close objects. While the condition may seem to occur suddenly, it actually takes a few years for your lenses to become weak.   

Common symptoms. If you hold reading materials at arm’s length, you might have presbyopia. Additional signs include blurred vision when you’re reading at a normal distance as well as eye strain with headaches when you work on things up close. 

Simple solutions. To help you see clearly and comfortably, an optometrist can prescribe reading glasses, bifocals, trifocals, or contact lenses to compensate for presbyopia. You may only need to use glasses to complete up close work, such as reading, but you might also find it beneficial to use vision correction at all times. 

As with any changing condition, presbyopia requires periodic monitoring. An annual visit to our office will ensure that you’re equipped with the best corrective vision solution for your needs. 

If you think you might have presbyopia or you’re due for another age-related vision check, don’t hesitate to contact us today!

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