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Welcome back for the second half of our series on the pros and cons of eyeglasses and contact lenses. Today, we break down the good things and not-so-good things about wearing contact lenses.

The Pros of Contact Lenses
  • You don’t have to worry about fogged lenses, which often plague glasses wearers when the climate changes.
  • As a matter of aesthetic preference, some prefer the natural look of wearing contact lenses over eyewear.
  • Contact lenses are less cumbersome for those that play sports.
The Cons of Contact Lenses
  • Contacts require a daily commitment of cleaning and care to avoid bacterial infections. 
  • While daily contact lenses reduce the need for regular care, they can be a more costly option. 
  • Contact lenses are more likely to increase your risk of dry, irritated eyes. 
  • Unlike eyewear, contact lenses can be difficult for some wearers to insert or remove. 
So, what’s your opinion? Do you think glasses or contact lenses are the better option? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section. Of course, if you need help deciding is best for your lifestyle, be sure to call our office and schedule an appointment. We’re more than happy to assist you with your eyecare needs.

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